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Bishop George V. Murry, SJ
U.S. Bishop Calls for Day of Prayer for Peace on Feast of St. Peter Claver, SJ

September 8, 2017 — Tomorrow marks the feast day of St. Peter Claver, a Jesuit missionary known as the patron saint of slaves, African missions and interracial justice. St. Claver spent his life serving African slaves who were brought to Colombia during the 17th century.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has called for the second Day of Prayer for Peace in Our Communities on St. Claver’s feast day. Bishop George V. Murry, SJ, chairman of the U.S. bishops' Ad Hoc Committee Against Racism, said, "St. Peter Claver is a model for us in understanding that hard work and perseverance is required to combat the sin of racism and build community; we must begin and end this effort in prayer together, even as we seek to act in concrete ways."

The USCCB offers resources for the day, including a prayer card, prayers of the faithful for Mass, bishops’ statements, and stories of how faith communities around the country are working for racial justice.

Fr. Peter Bisson, SJ, provincial of the English Canada Province Jesuits, shares his thoughts on prayer for the Day of Prayer:

Pope Francis will be in Colombia, where St. Claver ministered, on his feast day. On Sept. 10, he plans to pray the Angelus outside of the sanctuary of St. Peter Claver. The building where the missionary welcomed slaves, and which now houses the saint's relics, has also served as a school and a hospital. After private prayer time in the sanctuary, the pope will meet with fellow Jesuits.

Born on June 26, 1580, in Catalonia, Spain, St. Claver studied at the University of Barcelona and joined the Jesuits at age 20 in 1602. While studying philosophy in Majorca in 1605, St. Claver developed a friendship with Jesuit Brother Alphonsus Rodriguez. Br. Rodriguez, who spent his days doing menial work as a doorkeeper, encouraged St. Claver to become a missionary in the Spanish colonies in America.

In 1610, St. Claver voyaged from Spain to Cartagena, Colombia, where, after five years of further study, he was ordained a priest. Despite Pope Paul III's repeated condemnations of slavery during the previous century, European colonists continued importing African slaves to work on plantations and in mines. St. Claver threw himself into his ministry, bringing aid to the African slaves despite his own health problems and the language barrier between himself and the population he served.

With the help of multi-lingual catechists, St. Claver boarded every slave ship that entered the harbor. He was able to work among the slaves, offering immediate relief with medicines, biscuits, brandy, tobacco and lemons. “We must speak to them with our hands,” he said, “before we try to speak to them with our lips.” Whenever he came upon a baby born during the voyage or a dying slave, St. Claver would stop to baptize them immediately.

Throughout his work, St. Claver survived on minimal amounts of food and sleep. His life of humility and penance led to miraculous occurrences — as when he healed the sick with the touch of his cloak or appeared surrounded by a supernatural light during his hospital visits.

In the last years of his life, St. Claver became sick with the plague and was too ill to leave his room. When he was anointed with the oil of the Sacrament of the Sick in 1654, Cartagenians crowded into his room to see him for the last time, treating it as a shrine.

He died on September 8, 1654, after having baptized and taught the faith to more than 300,000 slaves during his four decades in Cartagena.

He was beatified by Pius IX on July 16, 1850, and canonized along with his friend St. Alphonsus Rodriguez on January 15, 1888, by Pope Leo XIII.

In the video below, Jesuit Father James Kubicki talks about the life of St. Peter Claver:

[Sources: Catholic News AgencySt. Peter Claver ChurchIgnatian SpiritualityNew AdventCrux]





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